• How to remain faithful to Christ in times of crisis and war?
  • How to be a ruler and serve at the same time?
  • What virtues should a good ruler/politician have?


The last Austro-Hungarian monarch, Charles I, died of pneumonia in 1922 in poverty and exile. He ascended the throne in 1916 and his main goal was to stop the war rampage. However, the attempt to achieve peace and save his empire and position ended with his exile, the abolition of his monarchical rights and the forfeiture of his property to the state. Pope John Paul II declared him blessed in 2004, thus presenting him to the Church as an example worth following. His great-grandson, Imre von Habsburg-Lothringen, who is still spreading his legacy today, will tell us about the turbulent fate of our last monarch, who embodies the fragility of the Christian identity in public life.

Imre von Habsburg-Lothringen

Imre von Habsburg-Lothringen

Archduke Imre was born in 1985 as the son of Carl Christian von Habsburg-Lothringen and Princess Marie-Astrid of Luxembourg. He currently lives in Geneva with his wife and four daughters. He works as a financial consultant, specialising in the promotion of ethically responsible investing in the light of the principles of Catholic moral teaching. He also serves as a Vice-President of Accueil Louis et Zélie, an organisation dedicated to guiding people and families in difficult life situations, in line with the legacy of St. Louis and St. Zélie Martin, parents of St. Thérèse of Lisieux. Archduke Imre is also a promoter of the legacy of his great-grandfather, Blessed Emperor Charles, about whom he has lectured in various countries. It is through his great-grandfather Charles that he is linked to the history of the Habsburgs and other families that have ruled Central Europe since the earliest times. Among other things, he is (in the 35th generation) a direct descendant of St. Ludmilla and her husband, the Bohemian prince Bořivoj, who was baptized in 882 in Great Moravia by St. Methodius.

Samuel Trizuljak

Samuel Trizuljak

He is currently an internal PhD student at Charles University in Prague. His research focuses on the history of Catholic political thought in the 20th century. He holds a bachelor's degree in political science from Heidelberg and Cambridge and a master's degree in history from Oxford. He graduated from the Kolegium Antona Neuwirtha and collaborates with the Ladislav Hanus Fellowship, where he leads academic seminars and co-organizes the Bratislava Hanus Days Festival. In recent years, he has worked as a political advisor in the National Council of the Slovak Republic and at the Ministry of Defence of the Slovak Republic